Monthly Archives: May 2014

Cisco, Alcatel-Lucent, Huawei, Juniper maintain carrier router/switch lead, but SDN causes carrier pause – FierceTelecom

Cisco, Alcatel-Lucent, Huawei, Juniper maintain carrier router/switch lead, but SDN causes carrier pause – FierceTelecom.

Yes, this article is a couple months old, but I’m sure a lot of my friends and contacts who work for telecom carriers don’t follow news items like this particularly closely (you know who you are) but would still be interested in the results of the Infonetics study quoted in the article.

As the article notes (and here’s the link to Sean Buckley’s FierceTelecom article one more time, just for good measure, before I quote it):

While the top four router/switching vendors Cisco (Nasdaq: CSCO), Huawei, Alcatel-Lucent (NYSE: ALU) and Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR) maintained their dominant market positions in 2013, fourth-quarter carrier router/switch revenue declined 4 percent from the same period a year ago.

The article's accompanying graphic

Nothing much to see here, though revenue is slightly down.  Cisco, Huawei, Alcatel-Lucent, and Juniper still dominate.

Carrier router/switch data may not keep us yawning for long, though, as Infonetics analyst Michael Howard says “change is in the air.” You can read more about that here, in the Infonetics press release about the report featured in the FierceTelecom article.

Yeah, not my sexiest post, but I had this article squirreled away in hopes I’d get the blog up and running so I could share it.  Indeed, you can trace my interest in switch vendors back to my years working with ILECs.  If you’ve read this far, perhaps that’s where you developed your interest, too.

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Quick Hits (Fiber Edition): Metro Fiber Deployment, Fiber Leasing, FTTH Speeds, FTTH Penetration

Because of my years as an analyst with fiberoptics research firm KMI, I’ve always noticed fiber deployment articles and press releases.  Here are a few recent fiber network articles:

From a CLEC perspective, tw telecom is expanding its metro network in Nashville from  the city center out to the west side of the city.  This is in line with tw telecom’s November 2013 announcement that it had planned to expand its metro networks to 5 new markets and within at least 27 existing markets within a year.

Elsewhere, Shentel (Shenandoah Telecom) is seeing growth in its fiber leasing revenue.

Another carrier announced its intention to provide 1 Gpbs FTTH service, with Cox joining AT&T and Google Fiber in the FTTH speed arms race.

Turning to Europe, telecompaper reports on the growth of FTTH connection in Spain – 85% year-over-year in January to 650,000.  An interesting point in the article is a statistic about total fixed broadband connections (not just FTTH): A vast majority of new broadband connections were added by alternative network operators, with Telefonica and cable operators adding a much smaller number.

And while we’re on the topic of FTTH, though I don’t really have much to say, this is an interesting read I ran across recently that’s probably worth sharing.  It’s a bit of a chat about FTTH in Africa with some of the writer’s personal experience with an eye to history.  At one point, to put FTTH in Africa in context, it references a Google Africa Blog article that notes “only 16% of Africa’s 1 billion people are online.”  Again, this is a rather disconnected paragraph, but it’s interesting, nonetheless, and worth sharing.

That’s what’s drawn my attention the last few days, at least from a fiber perspective.  As always, the purpose of this blog is to share what I read and some thoughts about it with old friends and contacts in the telecom industry, as well as anyone I haven’t met who will find this interesting.  Obviously, today’s post was more news and less opinion.  Hope you’ve found it helpful.

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